Menopause and Depression

Menopause and depression

Depression is a common yet potentially serious symptom of menopause. It entails more than the occasional bout of sadness and, if not treated, can lead to more severe mental disorders and a lessened quality of life.

Women are especially susceptible to depression and when approaching menopause are even more so. Women ages 45 to 55 are four times more likely to have depression than women who have not yet reached that stage in life.

The main reason women, especially menopausal women, are more likely to suffer from depression is because of their hormonal imbalance.

Types of depression

There are six main types of depression. Some are more related to menopause than others. The following are categories of depression closely linked to menopause:

Major depression. Lasts for more than two weeks and is characterized by intense feelings of sadness, loss of interest in normal activities, withdrawal from friends and family, and negative thoughts.

Dysthymic disorder. Less intense than major depression, but often lasts for longer, normally for two years or more.

Adjustment disorder. Often brought on by a stressful event or situation. It can be acute (lasting less than six months) or chronic (lasting longer).

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD). A type of depression that is triggered by the seasons and most commonly caused by a lack of sunlight in the winter months.

Other types of depression less associated with menopause, but just as severe, include the following:

Manic depression or bipolar disorder. A brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in a person’s mood, energy, and ability to function. Symptoms can be very severe.

Psychotic depression. Includes some features of psychosis, such as hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that aren’t there) or delusions (irrational thoughts and fears).

Causes of Depression

The underlying cause of depression in menopausal women has to do with hormonal imbalance, especially decreased levels of estrogen. As women approach menopause, their estrogen levels begin to drop off. This hormone plays a big part in regulating brain functions, especially chemicals that influence mood, such as serotonin and cortisol. Decreasing levels of estrogen during menopause can also cause other physical and mental symptoms, such as hot flashes and anxiety, which can lead to depression.

Other causes include biochemical, genetic, personality, environmental factors and disease.

Treatments for Depression

Although depression can make a woman feel hopeless, a variety of treatment options exist that can help wash away her depression and keep her hope alive.

It is generally recommended that women begin with the least invasive option, which would be lifestyle changes. In the case of depression, this involves steps such as making sure to get

  • regular exercise
  • eating healthy
  • and practicing mind-body techniques such as meditation.

By simply including three 30 minute-long sessions of physical activity such as walking, jogging, swimming, and cycling into a weekly routine a woman can greatly relieve her milder symptoms of depression.

Similarly, eating healthily will also help to stabilize mood swings and alleviate depression. Lifestyle changes are an important first step to tackling depression, but there are other treatment options available if a woman were to feel that she needs further help in regaining a positive outlook on life.

The most effective approach, as depression in menopausal women is primarily caused by a hormonal imbalance, is to treat the problem directly at the hormonal source. A variety of natural and alternative supplements exist that may be able to address this imbalance.

We recommend the Manna Menopause Support to help increase estrogen levels in the most natural way possible, without any side effects. This product contains the best phyto-estrogens (plant derived estrogens) which can help to rebalance hormones in the body.

Menopause Support

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